Case Study Activity 50

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Danielle DeVille, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Case Study Activity 49

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Danielle DeVille, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Case Study Activity 48

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Danielle DeVille, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Case Study Activity 47

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Danielle DeVille, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Case Study Activity 45

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Danielle DeVille, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Case Study Activity 44

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Danielle DeVille, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Case Study Activity 43

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Danielle DeVille, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Case Study Activity 42

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Kristen Gray, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Case Study Activity 41

To complete this activity the learner must:

  1. Watch the corresponding video case study presented without diagnostic information.
  2. Complete the questions.  You must score 70% or higher to pass.

Activity Author

Kristen Gray, Ph.D. – Content Expert

Nurses, Doctors & Burnout

Major Depressive Disorder with Seasonal Pattern

Major Depressive Disorder with Seasonal Pattern

Accreditation Information

Course Title: Major Depressive Disorder with Seasonal Pattern

Release date: October, 2023

Expiration date: October, 2025

Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour

Hardware / Software Requirements: Compatible with Internet Explorer 6 and up, Mozilla Firefox 3 and up, Safari 4.0, and Google Chrome 10 and up.

If you have any questions, please contact MER at (800)-421-3756, http://www.cmepartner.org/contact

To see MER Privacy Policy, scroll to bottom of this page.

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and Symptom Media.

 

 

 

Target Audience

Licensed medical and healthcare professionals, physicians, mental healthcare professionals including psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists (particularly those who see child and adolescent patients and/or parents). Students and trainees within these disciplines as well as allied health professionals.

Underlying Need for this Course

The purpose of this course is to assist healthcare professionals in identifying and diagnosing MDD-SP for the purposes of formulating an appropriate case conceptualization and providing the individual with evidence-based options for treatment.

  • Healthcare workers must possess the knowledge of DSM-5-TR criteria for MDD-SP.
  • Healthcare workers need to be competent in assessing and identifying MDD-SP symptoms.
  • Healthcare workers need to perform an accurate case conceptualization and provide appropriate treatment referrals for individuals presenting with symptoms of MDD-SP.

Individuals with MDD-SP may present to a medical setting with somatic or behavioral complaints that are directly related to their depressive symptoms. It is important that healthcare providers be able to recognize symptoms of depression that occur in a seasonal pattern as a potential cause of the presenting complaints so that the individual is not sent home without a proper evaluation. It is imperative that healthcare workers possess the knowledge and ability to identify and assess for MDD-SP symptoms for the purposes of providing appropriate mental health treatment referrals to patients with MDD-SP.

  • Learners will gain knowledge of DSM-5-TR criteria for MDD-SP.
  • Learners will feel competent in their ability to identify and assess for symptoms of MDD-SP, as well as differentiate MDD-SP symptoms from similar symptoms of other disorders.
  • Learners will show performance improvement in their ability to provide appropriate treatment referrals for MDD-SP.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course learners will be able to:

  1. Identify symptom criteria for MDD-SP.
  2. Differentiate MDD-SP from other disorders with similar features.
  3. Label disorders commonly diagnosed concurrently with MDD-SP.
  4. Debunk misconceptions about MDD-SP.

Meet your instructor

Brooke Bartlett, Ph.D., Licensed Psychological Associate – Content Expert

Dr. Bartlett earned a Ph.D. and M.A. in clinical psychology from the University of Houston. She also earned a M.A. in psychology from Boston University, and a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine. Her clinical expertise is in the assessment and evidence-based treatment of PTSD and trauma-related pathology, anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance use disorders. She is particularly specialized and passionate about working with first responders and military veterans. Dr. Bartlett’s research interests focus on trauma-related pathology, with an emphasis on the examination of risk and resilience processes and behaviors relevant to PTSD. Much of her program of research is focused on first responder and military veteran populations, and she believes it is important to produce research grounded in novel theoretical approaches that can be applied to evidence-based clinical practice. Dr. Bartlett has contributed extensively to the scientific literature of trauma psychology through numerous peer-reviewed journal article publications and presentations at national and local conferences, as well as a co-authored published book chapter. In addition to her clinical and research practice, Dr. Bartlett is a faculty member at multiple academic institutions teaching a broad range of psychology courses.

Course Agenda

The activity is designed to assist healthcare workers in understanding and identifying DSM-5-TR criteria for major depressive disorder with seasonal pattern (MDD-SP). It will also assist healthcare workers in differentiating MDD-SP from mental health disorders that share similar symptoms/features. Learners will gain knowledge about disorders that are commonly diagnosed comorbidly with MDD-SP. Lastly, learners will be able to identify and correct common misconceptions about MDD-SP.

Multiple methods of instruction including a series of online course slides that outline learning objectives, and highlight relevant content. The online course slides are meant to prepare learners for a clinical case application. Learners may also  be offered a multiple-choice, subject matter test to assess comprehension of material and/or clinically applicable activities with the primary goal of learners being able to apply the information to a clinical practice setting.

Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Medical Education Resources (MER) and Symptom Media. MER is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team

 

Physician Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 ANCC nursing contact hours.  Nurses will be awarded contact hours upon successful completion of the activity.

Medical Education Resources is a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 12299, for 1 contact hours.

Physician Assistant Credit

Medical Education Resources has been authorized by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria.  This activity is designated for 1 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits.  Physician Assistants should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Psychologist Credit

Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs.

Social Work

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, Medical Education Resources is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. Social workers completing this course receive 1 clinical continuing education credits.

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Medical Education Resources ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all our educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies relevant financial relationships with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity.  Reported relevant financial relationships are mitigated by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a CE activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.  MER is committed to providing learners with high-quality CE activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of an ineligible company.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

The content managers reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Method of Participation
There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity (or insert fee amount if applicable).  During the period October, 2023 through October, 2025, participants must 1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, 2) study the educational activity, 3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, 4) complete the evaluation.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Media

Internet

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth edition, Text Revision. Washington D.C., American Psychiatric Association, 2022.
  2. Hasin, D. S., Sarvet, A. L., Meyers, J. L., et. Al. (2018) Epidemiology of adult DSM-5-TR major depressive disorder and its specifiers in the United States. JAMA Psychiatry, 75(4), 336-346. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.4602.
  3. Roecklein, K. A., & Rohan, K. J. (2005). Seasonal affective disorder: an overview and update. Psychiatry, 2(1), 20-26.
  4. Thaipisuttikul, P., Ittasakul, P., Waleeprakhon, P., Wisajun, P., & Jullagate, S. (2014). Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with major depressive disorder.  Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment, 10, 2097–2103. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S72026.

Disclaimer

The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Medical Education Resources and/or Symptom Media. The authors have disclosed if there is any discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA in their presentations. Before prescribing any medicine, primary references and full prescribing information should be consulted. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patient’s conditions and possible contraindications on dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management.

MER Privacy Policy: cmepartner.org/privacy

Treatment Resistant Depression

Treatment Resistant Depression: What it is and how to treat it

Accreditation Information

Course Title: Treatment Resistant Depression: What it is and how to treat it

Release date: October, 2023

Expiration date: October, 2025

Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour

Hardware / Software Requirements: Compatible with Internet Explorer 6 and up, Mozilla Firefox 3 and up, Safari 4.0, and Google Chrome 10 and up.

If you have any questions, please contact MER at (800)-421-3756, http://www.cmepartner.org/contact

To see MER Privacy Policy, scroll to bottom of this page.

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and Symptom Media.

 

 

 

Target Audience

Physicians, licensed medical and healthcare professionals who are likely to see clients with depression in their medical and primary care units and practices.  Mental healthcare professionals including psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists. Students and trainees within these disciplines as well as allied health professionals.

Underlying Need for this Course

The purpose of this course is to assist healthcare professionals in recognizing and diagnosing Treatment Resistant Depression for the purposes of formulating an appropriate case conceptualization and providing the individual with evidence-based interventions for treatment.

  • Healthcare providers need to possess the knowledge of DSM-5-TR criteria for MDD and the definition of treatment resistant depression.
  • Healthcare providers need to be competent in assessing for treatment resistant depression.
  • Healthcare providers need to perform an accurate assessment of treatment resistant depression and provide appropriate treatment and/or referrals if needed.

Individuals may present to medical or psychiatric providers with symptoms consistent with treatment resistant MDD. 50-60% of patients do not achieve adequate response from antidepressant trial, so it is important for providers to have knowledge of the treatments for this condition.It is also imperative that healthcare providers have the ability to differentiate this condition from other psychiatric illnesses.

  • Learners will gain knowledge about the definitions of treatment resistant depression.
  • Learners will be competent in their ability to identify treatment resistant disorder from other mental health conditions.
  • Learners will show improved performance in their ability to provide appropriate treatment and referrals for Treatment resistant depression.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course learners will be able to:

  1. Define treatment resistant depression.
  2. Discuss differential diagnoses for treatment resistant depression (TRD).
  3. Identify risk factors for treatment resistant depression.
  4. Describe interventions used to treat TRD.

Meet Your Instructor

Kirby P. Williams, MSN, PMHNP-BC

Ms. Kirby P. Williams started her nursing career as a hospital RN working in various medical specialties. Her interest in psychiatry and mental health care developed when she saw the gaps in care and attention to the mental health conditions of hospitalized patients. She obtained her adult psychiatric nurse practitioner certification in 2011 and has worked in various settings including  acute inpatient psychiatry, community mental health, primary care psychiatric consults, private practice and academia. Ms. Williams has served as a graduate nursing preceptor since 2012. Currently, she works as an outpatient community mental health nurse practitioner  through Richmond Behavioral Health Authority. Through her private business, Beacon Behavioral Health and Consulting, she provides consulting to individual PMHNPs and organizations who seek mental health support and education.

Course Agenda

Healthcare providers provide treatment for various types of depression symptoms and subtypes. This activity is designed to educate healthcare providers on identification and treatment resistant depression. This activity will also provide knowledge on common differential diagnosis and how to differentiate this type of depression for those diagnoses. Lastly learners will be able to identify risk factors for this type of depression.

Multiple methods of instruction including a series of online course slides that outline learning objectives, and highlight relevant content. The online course slides are meant to prepare learners for a clinical case application. Learners may also be offered a multiple-choice, subject matter test to assess comprehension of material and/or clinically applicable activities with the primary goal of learners being able to apply the information

to a clinical practice setting.

Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Medical Education Resources (MER) and Symptom Media. MER is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team

 

Physician Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 ANCC nursing contact hours.  Nurses will be awarded contact hours upon successful completion of the activity.

Medical Education Resources is a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 12299, for 1 contact hours.

Physician Assistant Credit

Medical Education Resources has been authorized by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria.  This activity is designated for 1 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits.  Physician Assistants should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Psychologist Credit

Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs.

Social Work

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, Medical Education Resources is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. Social workers completing this course receive 1 clinical continuing education credits.

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Medical Education Resources ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all our educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies relevant financial relationships with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity.  Reported relevant financial relationships are mitigated by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a CE activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.  MER is committed to providing learners with high-quality CE activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of an ineligible company.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

The content managers reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Method of Participation

There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity (or insert fee amount if applicable).  During the period October, 2023 through October, 2025, participants must 1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, 2) study the educational activity, 3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, 4) complete the evaluation.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Media

Internet

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (2022). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed., text rev.). https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425787
  2. Carlat, D.C., & Puzantian T. (2020) Medication Fact Book for Psychiatric Practice (5th ed.) Carlat Publishing
  3. Seretti, A. & Fabbri C. (2014). Factors that predispose patients to Treatment-resistant depression. Psychiatric Times, 31 (9). https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/factors-predispose-patients-treatment-resistant-depression
  4. CMS. (2018). Definition of treatment-resistant depression in the Medicare population. CMS.gov Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Retrieved January 2, 2023, from https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/view/technology-assessments.aspx?TAId=105&bc=AAAEAAAAAAAA&
  5. American Psychiatric Association. (2020). Pharmacological approaches to treatment-resistant depression. Retrieved January 2, 2023, from https://education.psychiatry.org/diweb/catalog/item?id=6461491
  6. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. (2021, April 10). Treatment-resistant depression. Mayo Clinic. Retrieved January 2, 2023, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/treatment-resistant-depression/art-20044324
  7. McDonald, W., & Fochtmann, L. (2019). What is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)? Psychiatry.org – What is Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT)? Retrieved January 2, 2023, from https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/ect

Disclaimer

The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Medical Education Resources and/or Symptom Media. The authors have disclosed if there is any discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA in their presentations. Before prescribing any medicine, primary references and full prescribing information should be consulted. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patient’s conditions and possible contraindications on dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management.

MER Privacy Policy: cmepartner.org/privacy

Identifying Substance Abuse as a Coping Mechanism for Psychological Distress

Identifying Substance Abuse as a Coping Mechanism for Psychological Distress

Accreditation Information

Course Title: Identifying Substance Abuse as a Coping Mechanism for Psychological Distress

Release date: October, 2023

Expiration date: October, 2025

Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour

Hardware / Software Requirements: Compatible with Internet Explorer 6 and up, Mozilla Firefox 3 and up, Safari 4.0, and Google Chrome 10 and up.

If you have any questions, please contact MER at (800)-421-3756, http://www.cmepartner.org/contact

To see MER Privacy Policy, scroll to bottom of this page.

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and Symptom Media.

 

 

 

Target Audience

Licensed medical and healthcare professionals, physicians, mental healthcare professionals including psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists (particularly those who see child and adolescent patients and/or parents). Students and trainees within these disciplines as well as allied health professionals.

Underlying Need for this Course

The purpose of this course is to assist healthcare professionals in properly identifying when teletherapy patients are abusing substances to cope with psychological distress for the purposes of providing effective resources and treatment recommendations.

  • Healthcare workers must possess the knowledge of symptoms pertaining to substance abuse among teletherapy patients.
  • Healthcare workers need to be competent in identifying substance abuse among teletherapy patients.
  • Healthcare workers need to provide appropriate resources and treatment recommendations for teletherapy patients using substances to cope with psychological distress.

Substance use disorders are highly prevalent in the U.S. Patients may use substances as a self-medication tool to reduce psychological distress and negative emotionality. It is imperative that providers are competent in assessing for substance abuse and can properly conceptualize a potential substance use disorder.

  • Learners will gain knowledge of substance abuse.
  • Learners will feel competent in their ability to identify when substances are being used to cope with psychological distress.
  • Learners will show performance improvement in their ability to differentiate substance use from substance abuse.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course learners will be able to:

  1. Identify substance abuse.
  2. Differentiate substance abuse with substance use.
  3. Identify general guidelines to follow when assessing for substance abuse.
  4. Debunk misconceptions about substance abuse and self-medication.

Meet your instructor

Brooke Bartlett, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist – Content Expert

Dr. Bartlett earned a Ph.D. and M.A. in clinical psychology from the University of Houston. She also earned a M.A. in psychology from Boston University, and a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine. Her clinical expertise is in the assessment and evidence-based treatment of PTSD and trauma-related pathology, anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance use disorders. She is particularly specialized and passionate about working with first responders and military veterans. Dr. Bartlett’s research interests focus on trauma-related pathology, with an emphasis on the examination of risk and resilience processes and behaviors relevant to PTSD. Much of her program of research is focused on first responder and military veteran populations, and she believes it is important to produce research grounded in novel theoretical approaches that can be applied to evidence-based clinical practice. Dr. Bartlett has contributed extensively to the scientific literature of trauma psychology through numerous peer-reviewed journal article publications and presentations at national and local conferences, as well as a co-authored published book chapter. In addition to her clinical and research practice, Dr. Bartlett is a faculty member at multiple academic institutions teaching a broad range of psychology courses.

Course Agenda

The activity is designed to assist healthcare workers in identifying when teletherapy patients are abusing substances as a means of coping with psychological distress. It will also provide healthcare workers with general guidelines about how to approach teletherapy patients abusing substances, and learners will be able to identify and correct common misconceptions about self-medication.

Multiple methods of instruction including a series of online course slides that outline learning objectives, and highlight relevant content. The online course slides are meant to prepare learners for a clinical case application. Learners will also be offered multiple-choice, subject matter tests to assess comprehension of materials.

Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Medical Education Resources (MER) and Symptom Media. MER is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team

 

Physician Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 ANCC nursing contact hours.  Nurses will be awarded contact hours upon successful completion of the activity.

Medical Education Resources is a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 12299, for 1 contact hours.

Physician Assistant Credit

Medical Education Resources has been authorized by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria.  This activity is designated for 1 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits.  Physician Assistants should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Psychologist Credit

Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs.

Social Work

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, Medical Education Resources is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. Social workers completing this course receive 1 general continuing education credits.

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Medical Education Resources ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all our educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies relevant financial relationships with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity.  Reported relevant financial relationships are mitigated by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a CE activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.  MER is committed to providing learners with high-quality CE activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of an ineligible company.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

The content managers reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Method of Participation
There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity (or insert fee amount if applicable). During the period October, 2023 through October, 2025, participants must 1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, 2) study the educational activity, 3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, 4) complete the evaluation.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Media

Internet

References

  • American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth edition, Text Revision. Washington D.C., American Psychiatric Association, 2022.
  • Baker TB, et al. Addiction motivation reformulated: An affective processing model of negative reinforcement. Psychol. Rev. 2004; 111:33–51.
  • Blume, A. W., Schmaling, K. B., & Marlatt, G. A. (2000). Revisiting the self-medication hypothesis from a behavioral perspective. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 7(4), 379-384.
  • Flanagan, J. C., Korte, K. J., Killeen, T. K., & Back, S. E. (2016). Concurrent Treatment of Substance Use and PTSD. Current psychiatry reports, 18(8), 70. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-016-0709-y.
  • John Hopkins Medicine. (n.d.).  Substance Abuse/Chemical Dependency. John Hopkins Medicine. Retrieved December 20, 2022, from https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/substance-abuse-chemical-dependency.
  • Khantzian EJ. The self-medication hypothesis of addictive disorders: Focus on heroin and cocaine dependence. Am. J. Psychiatry. 1985; 142:1259–1264.
  • Sinha R. How does stress increase risk of drug abuse and relapse? Psychopharmacology (Berl.) 2001;158:343–359.
  • Sinha, R. (2008). Chronic stress, drug use, and vulnerability to addiction. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1141, 105–130. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1441.030.

Disclaimer

The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Medical Education Resources and/or Symptom Media. The authors have disclosed if there is any discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA in their presentations. Before prescribing any medicine, primary references and full prescribing information should be consulted. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patient’s conditions and possible contraindications on dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management.

MER Privacy Policy: cmepartner.org/privacy

Child Maltreatment and Mandated Reporting via Teletherapy

Child Maltreatment and Mandated Reporting via Teletherapy

Accreditation Information

Course Title: Child Maltreatment and Mandated Reporting via Teletherapy

Release date: June, 2023

Expiration date: June, 2025

Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour

Hardware / Software Requirements: Compatible with Internet Explorer 6 and up, Mozilla Firefox 3 and up, Safari 4.0, and Google Chrome 10 and up.

If you have any questions, please contact MER at (800)-421-3756, http://www.cmepartner.org/contact

To see MER Privacy Policy, scroll to bottom of this page.

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and Symptom Media.

 

 

Target Audience

Licensed medical and healthcare professionals, physicians, mental healthcare professionals including psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists (particularly those who see child and adolescent patients and/or parents). Students and trainees within these disciplines as well as allied health professionals.

Underlying Need for this Course

The purpose of this course is to assist healthcare professionals in properly defining child maltreatment and identifying when mandated reporting is necessary for the purposes of providing effective resources and treatment recommendations.

  • Healthcare workers must possess the knowledge of what constitutes child maltreatment.
  • Healthcare workers need to be competent in identifying situations that require mandated reporting.
  • Healthcare workers need to provide appropriate guidelines for handling mandated reporting related to child maltreatment with patients.

It is imperative that healthcare providers are confident in their ability to define and identify child maltreatment for the safety of the children at risk. Moreover, it is important for healthcare workers to feel confident in their ability to identify situations that require mandated reporting relating to child maltreatment, as there are often serious ramifications for not doing so.

  • Learners will gain knowledge of child maltreatment.
  • Learners will feel competent in their ability to identify when mandated reporting is necessary.
  • Learners will show performance improvement in their ability to handle instances of mandated reporting as it relates to child maltreatment.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course learners will be able to:

  1. Define child maltreatment.
  2. Identify situations that require mandated reporting related to child maltreatment.
  3. Identify general guidelines to follow when assessing for potential child maltreatment.
  4. Debunk misconceptions about mandated reporting as it relates to child abuse.

Meet your instructor

Brooke Bartlett, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist – Content Expert

Dr. Bartlett earned a Ph.D. and M.A. in clinical psychology from the University of Houston. She also earned a M.A. in psychology from Boston University, and a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine. Her clinical expertise is in the assessment and evidence-based treatment of PTSD and trauma-related pathology, anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance use disorders. She is particularly specialized and passionate about working with first responders and military veterans. Dr. Bartlett’s research interests focus on trauma-related pathology, with an emphasis on the examination of risk and resilience processes and behaviors relevant to PTSD. Much of her program of research is focused on first responder and military veteran populations, and she believes it is important to produce research grounded in novel theoretical approaches that can be applied to evidence-based clinical practice. Dr. Bartlett has contributed extensively to the scientific literature of trauma psychology through numerous peer-reviewed journal article publications and presentations at national and local conferences, as well as a co-authored published book chapter. In addition to her clinical and research practice, Dr. Bartlett is a faculty member at multiple academic institutions teaching a broad range of psychology courses.

Course Agenda

The activity is designed to assist healthcare workers in defining child maltreatment and identifying when mandated reporting is necessary. It will also provide healthcare workers with general guidelines about how to approach instances of mandated reporting, and learners will be able to identify and correct common misconceptions about it.

Multiple methods of instruction including a series of online course slides that outline learning objectives, and highlight relevant content. The online course slides are meant to prepare learners for a clinical case application. Learners will also be offered multiple-choice, subject matter tests to assess comprehension of materials.

Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Medical Education Resources (MER) and Symptom Media. MER is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team

 

Physician Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 ANCC nursing contact hours.  Nurses will be awarded contact hours upon successful completion of the activity.

Medical Education Resources is a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 12299, for 1 contact hours.

Physician Assistant Credit

Medical Education Resources has been authorized by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria.  This activity is designated for 1 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits.  Physician Assistants should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Psychologist Credit

Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs.

Social Work

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, Medical Education Resources is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. Social workers completing this course receive 1 general continuing education credits.

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Medical Education Resources ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all our educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies relevant financial relationships with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity.  Reported relevant financial relationships are mitigated by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a CE activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.  MER is committed to providing learners with high-quality CE activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of an ineligible company.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

The content managers reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Method of Participation
There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity (or insert fee amount if applicable). During the period June, 2023 through June 2025, participants must 1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, 2) study the educational activity, 3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, 4) complete the evaluation.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Media

Internet

References

  • American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth edition, Text Revision. Washington D.C., American Psychiatric Association, 2022.
  • Child Welfare Information Gateway. (n.d.).  Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect. Retrieved January 25, 2023, from https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/can/defining/.
  • Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2019). Mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau.

Disclaimer

The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Medical Education Resources and/or Symptom Media. The authors have disclosed if there is any discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA in their presentations. Before prescribing any medicine, primary references and full prescribing information should be consulted. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patient’s conditions and possible contraindications on dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management.

MER Privacy Policy: cmepartner.org/privacy

Differentiating PTSD and Panic Disorder on Teletherapy

Differentiating PTSD and Panic Disorder on Teletherapy

Accreditation Information

Course Title: Differentiating PTSD and Panic Disorder on Teletherapy

Release date: June, 2023

Expiration date: June, 2025

Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour

Hardware / Software Requirements: Compatible with Internet Explorer 6 and up, Mozilla Firefox 3 and up, Safari 4.0, and Google Chrome 10 and up.

If you have any questions, please contact MER at (800)-421-3756, http://www.cmepartner.org/contact

To see MER Privacy Policy, scroll to bottom of this page.

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and Symptom Media.

 

 

 

Target Audience

Licensed medical and healthcare professionals, physicians, mental healthcare professionals including psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists (particularly those who see child and adolescent patients and/or parents). Students and trainees within these disciplines as well as allied health professionals.

Underlying Need for this Course

The purpose of this course is to assist healthcare professionals in properly identifying and differentiating PTSD and panic disorder teletherapy patients for the purposes of providing effective resources and treatment recommendations.

  • Healthcare workers must possess the knowledge of symptoms pertaining to PTSD and panic disorder among teletherapy patients.
  • Healthcare workers need to be competent in identifying PTSD and/or panic disorder among teletherapy patients.
  • Healthcare workers need to provide appropriate resources and treatment recommendations for teletherapy patients experiencing symptoms of PTSD and/or panic disorder.

PTSD and panic disorder have similar symptoms, and as a result, providers sometimes give patients incorrect treatment recommendations. Being able to assess for and distinguish PTSD and panic disorder is imperative for providing appropriate prevention and intervention methods.

  •  Learners will gain knowledge of PTSD and panic disorder.
  • Learners will feel competent in their ability to identify and assess for PTSD and panic disorder.
  • Learners will show performance improvement in their ability to differentiate PTSD and panic disorder.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course learners will be able to:

  1. Identify PTSD and panic disorder.
  2. Differentiate PTSD and panic disorder.
  3. Identify general guidelines to follow when determining whether a patient is experiencing symptoms of PTSD and panic disorder.
  4. Debunk misconceptions about PTSD and panic disorder.

Meet your instructor

Brooke Bartlett, Ph.D., Licensed Psychological Associate – Content Expert

Dr. Bartlett earned a Ph.D. and M.A. in clinical psychology from the University of Houston. She also earned a M.A. in psychology from Boston University, and a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine. Her clinical expertise is in the assessment and evidence-based treatment of PTSD and trauma-related pathology, anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance use disorders. She is particularly specialized and passionate about working with first responders and military veterans. Dr. Bartlett’s research interests focus on trauma-related pathology, with an emphasis on the examination of risk and resilience processes and behaviors relevant to PTSD. Much of her program of research is focused on first responder and military veteran populations, and she believes it is important to produce research grounded in novel theoretical approaches that can be applied to evidence-based clinical practice. Dr. Bartlett has contributed extensively to the scientific literature of trauma psychology through numerous peer-reviewed journal article publications and presentations at national and local conferences, as well as a co-authored published book chapter. In addition to her clinical and research practice, Dr. Bartlett is a faculty member at multiple academic institutions teaching a broad range of psychology courses.

Course Agenda

The activity is designed to assist healthcare workers in identifying and differentiating PTSD and panic disorder. It will also provide healthcare workers with general guidelines about how to approach teletherapy patients presenting with symptoms related to PTSD and/or panic disorder, and learners will be able to identify and correct common misconceptions about the two diagnoses.

Multiple methods of instruction including a series of online course slides that outline learning objectives, and highlight relevant content. The online course slides are meant to prepare learners for a clinical case application. Learners will also be offered multiple-choice, subject matter tests to assess comprehension of materials.

Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Medical Education Resources (MER) and Symptom Media. MER is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team

 

Physician Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 ANCC nursing contact hours.  Nurses will be awarded contact hours upon successful completion of the activity.

Medical Education Resources is a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 12299, for 1 contact hours.

Physician Assistant Credit

Medical Education Resources has been authorized by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria.  This activity is designated for 1 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits.  Physician Assistants should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Psychologist Credit

Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs.

Social Work

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, Medical Education Resources is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. Social workers completing this course receive 1 general continuing education credits.

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Medical Education Resources ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all our educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies relevant financial relationships with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity.  Reported relevant financial relationships are mitigated by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a CE activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.  MER is committed to providing learners with high-quality CE activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of an ineligible company.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

The content managers reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Method of Participation
There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity (or insert fee amount if applicable). During the period June, 2023 through June, 2025, participants must 1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, 2) study the educational activity, 3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, 4) complete the evaluation.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Media

Internet

References

  • American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth edition, Text Revision. Washington D.C., American Psychiatric Association, 2022.

Disclaimer

The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Medical Education Resources and/or Symptom Media. The authors have disclosed if there is any discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA in their presentations. Before prescribing any medicine, primary references and full prescribing information should be consulted. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patient’s conditions and possible contraindications on dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management.

MER Privacy Policy: cmepartner.org/privacy

Tourettes Disorder

Tourette’s Disorder

Accreditation Information

Course Title: Tourette’s disorder

Release date: May, 2023

Expiration date: May, 2025

Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour

Hardware / Software Requirements: Compatible with Internet Explorer 6 and up, Mozilla Firefox 3 and up, Safari 4.0, and Google Chrome 10 and up.

If you have any questions, please contact MER at (800)-421-3756, http://www.cmepartner.org/contact

To see MER Privacy Policy, scroll to bottom of this page.

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and Symptom Media.

 

 

 

Target Audience

Physicians, licensed medical and healthcare professionals, including those who work with children, as Tourette’s disorder is neurodevelopmental in nature and first presents in childhood. Mental healthcare professionals including psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists. Students and trainees within these disciplines as well as allied health professionals.

Underlying Need for this Course

The purpose of this course is to assist healthcare professionals in identifying and diagnosing Tourette’s disorder for the purposes of formulating an appropriate case conceptualization and providing the individual with evidence-based options for treatment.

  • Healthcare workers must possess the knowledge of DSM-5-TR criteria for Tourette’s disorder.
  • Healthcare workers need to be competent in assessing and identifying Tourette’s disorder symptoms.
  • Healthcare workers need to perform an accurate case conceptualization and provide appropriate treatment referrals for individuals presenting with symptoms of Tourette’s disorder.

Given the early age of onset, children with Tourette’s disorder may first present to a pediatrician or family medicine physician. Prompt recognition and accurate diagnosis are essential. Secondary causes of tic disorders, including underlying medical conditions, should be ruled out. Although rare, certain tics can lead to physical injury (e.g., eye injury from hitting oneself in the face, injury related to forceful head and neck movements). Comprehensive evaluation of tics is therefore imperative. Many children with tic disorders encounter academic difficulties, and coordination with the child’s school system to ensure adequate support and accommodations may be necessary. Finally, adequate attention must be given to comorbid disorders. Many individuals with Tourette’s disorder meet diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. This can pose treatment issues, as certain stimulant medications often used in ADHD have been shown to exacerbate tics.

  •  Learners will gain knowledge of DSM-5 criteria for Tourette’s disorder.
  • Learners will feel competent in their ability to identify and assess for symptoms of Tourette’s disorder, as well as differentiate Tourette’s disorder symptoms from other anxiety disorder-based symptoms.
  • Learners will show performance improvement in their ability to provide appropriate treatment referrals for Tourette’s disorder.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course learners will be able to:

  1. Identify symptom criteria for Tourette’s disorder.
  2. Differentiate Tourette’s disorder from other disorders with similar features.
  3. Label disorders commonly diagnosed concurrently with Tourette’s disorder.
  4. Define misconceptions about Tourette’s disorder.

Meet your instructor

Brooke Bartlett, Ph.D., Licensed Psychological Associate – Content Expert

Dr. Bartlett earned a Ph.D. and M.A. in clinical psychology from the University of Houston. She also earned a M.A. in psychology from Boston University, and a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine. Her clinical expertise is in the assessment and evidence-based treatment of PTSD and trauma-related pathology, anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance use disorders. She is particularly specialized and passionate about working with first responders and military veterans. Dr. Bartlett’s research interests focus on trauma-related pathology, with an emphasis on the examination of risk and resilience processes and behaviors relevant to PTSD. Much of her program of research is focused on first responder and military veteran populations, and she believes it is important to produce research grounded in novel theoretical approaches that can be applied to evidence-based clinical practice. Dr. Bartlett has contributed extensively to the scientific literature of trauma psychology through numerous peer-reviewed journal article publications and presentations at national and local conferences, as well as a co-authored published book chapter. In addition to her clinical and research practice, Dr. Bartlett is a faculty member at multiple academic institutions teaching a broad range of psychology courses.

Course Agenda

The activity is designed to assist healthcare workers in understanding and identifying DSM-5-TR criteria for Tourette’s disorder. It will also assist healthcare workers in differentiating Tourette’s disorder from mental health disorders that share similar symptoms/features. Learners will gain knowledge about disorders that are commonly diagnosed comorbidly with Tourette’s disorder. Lastly, learners will be able to identify and correct common misconceptions about Tourette’s disorder.

Multiple methods of instruction including a series of online course slides that outline learning objectives, and highlight relevant content. The online course slides are meant to prepare learners for a clinical case application. Learners may also be offered a multiple-choice subject matter test to assess comprehension of material and/or clinically applicable activities with the primary goal of learners being able to apply the information to a clinical practice setting.

Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Medical Education Resources (MER) and Symptom Media. MER is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team

 

Physician Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 ANCC nursing contact hours.  Nurses will be awarded contact hours upon successful completion of the activity.

Medical Education Resources is a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 12299, for 1 contact hours.

Physician Assistant Credit

Medical Education Resources has been authorized by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria.  This activity is designated for 1 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits.  Physician Assistants should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Psychologist Credit

Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs.

Social Work

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, Medical Education Resources is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. Social workers completing this course receive 1 clinical continuing education credits.

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Medical Education Resources ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all our educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies relevant financial relationships with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity.  Reported relevant financial relationships are mitigated by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a CE activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.  MER is committed to providing learners with high-quality CE activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of an ineligible company.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

The content managers reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Method of Participation
There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity (or insert fee amount if applicable).  During the period May, 2023 through May, 2025, participants must 1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, 2) study the educational activity, 3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, 4) complete the evaluation.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Media

Internet

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (2022). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed., text rev.). https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425787
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. Data & Statistics on Tourette Syndrome. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/tourette/data.html. Accessed October 14, 2022.
  3. Franklin, M. E., Harrison, J., & Benavides, K. (2013). Treatment of childhood tic disorders with comorbid OCD. In Handbook of Treating Variants and Complications in Anxiety Disorders (pp. 135-148). Springer, New York, NY.
  4. Tourette Association of America (2016). Debunking Myths and Misconceptions. https://tourette.org/debunking-myths-misconceptions/. Accessed October 14, 2022.
  5. Leckman, J. F., Riddle, M. A., Hardin, M. T., Ort, S. I., Swartz, K. L., Stevenson, J. O. H. N., & Cohen, D. J. (1989). The Yale Global Tic Severity Scale: Initial testing of a clinician-rated scale of tic severity. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 28(4), 566-573.
  6. Woods, D. W., Piacentini, J., Chang, S., Deckersbach, T., Ginsburg, G., Peterson, A., Scahill, L., Walkup, J., & Wilhelm, S. (2008). Managing Tourette syndrome: A behavioral intervention for children and adults therapist guide. Oxford University Press.

Disclaimer

The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Medical Education Resources and/or Symptom Media. The authors have disclosed if there is any discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA in their presentations. Before prescribing any medicine, primary references and full prescribing information should be consulted. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patient’s conditions and possible contraindications on dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management.

MER Privacy Policy: cmepartner.org/privacy

Assessing for Trauma-Related Flashbacks via Teletherapy

Assessing for Trauma-Related Flashbacks via Teletherapy

Accreditation Information

Course Title: Assessing for Trauma-Related Flashbacks via Teletherapy

Release date: May, 2023

Expiration date: May, 2025

Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour

Hardware / Software Requirements: Compatible with Internet Explorer 6 and up, Mozilla Firefox 3 and up, Safari 4.0, and Google Chrome 10 and up.

If you have any questions, please contact MER at (800)-421-3756, http://www.cmepartner.org/contact

To see MER Privacy Policy, scroll to bottom of this page.

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and Symptom Media.

 

 

Target Audience

Licensed medical and healthcare professionals, physicians, mental healthcare professionals including psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists (particularly those who see child and adolescent patients and/or parents). Students and trainees within these disciplines as well as allied health professionals.

Underlying Need for this Course

The purpose of this course is to assist healthcare professionals in properly identifying and assessing for TRFBs for the purposes of providing effective resources and treatment recommendations.

  • Healthcare workers must possess the knowledge of symptoms pertaining to TRFBs among teletherapy patients.
  • Healthcare workers need to be competent in identifying TRFBs among teletherapy patients.
  • Healthcare workers need to provide appropriate resources and treatment recommendations for teletherapy patients experiencing symptoms of TRFB.

Symptoms of TRFBs may be difficult to identify and are often over diagnosed. It is imperative that providers are able to identify symptoms of TRFB’s among teletherapy patients and approach them in a culturally competent manner. Being able to identify symptoms TRFBs will lead to appropriate evaluation and treatment recommendations.

  • Learners will gain knowledge of TRFBs.
  • Learners will feel competent in their ability to identify TRFBs.
  • Learners will show performance improvement in their ability to assess for TRFBs.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course learners will be able to:

  1. Identify TRFBs.
  2. Assess for TRFBs.
  3. Identify general guidelines to follow when working with a teletherapy patient reporting symptoms of a TRFB.
  4. Debunk misconceptions about TRFBs.

Meet your instructor

Brooke Bartlett, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist – Content Expert

Dr. Bartlett earned a Ph.D. and M.A. in clinical psychology from the University of Houston. She also earned a M.A. in psychology from Boston University, and a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine. Her clinical expertise is in the assessment and evidence-based treatment of PTSD and trauma-related pathology, anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance use disorders. She is particularly specialized and passionate about working with first responders and military veterans. Dr. Bartlett’s research interests focus on trauma-related pathology, with an emphasis on the examination of risk and resilience processes and behaviors relevant to PTSD. Much of her program of research is focused on first responder and military veteran populations, and she believes it is important to produce research grounded in novel theoretical approaches that can be applied to evidence-based clinical practice. Dr. Bartlett has contributed extensively to the scientific literature of trauma psychology through numerous peer-reviewed journal article publications and presentations at national and local conferences, as well as a co-authored published book chapter. In addition to her clinical and research practice, Dr. Bartlett is a faculty member at multiple academic institutions teaching a broad range of psychology courses.

Course Agenda

The activity is designed to assist healthcare workers in identifying and assessing for trauma-related flashbacks (TRFBs). It will also provide healthcare workers with general guidelines about how to approach teletherapy patients presenting with symptoms related to TRFBs, and learners will be able to identify and correct common misconceptions about them.

Multiple methods of instruction including a series of online course slides that outline learning objectives, and highlight relevant content. The online course slides are meant to prepare learners for a clinical case application. Learners will also be offered multiple-choice, subject matter tests to assess comprehension of materials.

Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Medical Education Resources (MER) and Symptom Media. MER is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team

 

Physician Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit
Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 ANCC nursing contact hours.  Nurses will be awarded contact hours upon successful completion of the activity.

Medical Education Resources is a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 12299, for 1 contact hours.

Physician Assistant Credit

Medical Education Resources has been authorized by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria.  This activity is designated for 1 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits.  Physician Assistants should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Psychologist Credit

Continuing Education (CE) credits for psychologists are provided through the co-sponsorship of the American Psychological Association (APA) Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). The APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for the content of the programs.

Social Work

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, Medical Education Resources is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. Social workers completing this course receive 1 general continuing education credits.

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Medical Education Resources ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all our educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies relevant financial relationships with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity.  Reported relevant financial relationships are mitigated by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a CE activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.  MER is committed to providing learners with high-quality CE activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of an ineligible company.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

The content managers reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Method of Participation
There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity (or insert fee amount if applicable). During the period May, 2023 through May, 2025, participants must 1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, 2) study the educational activity, 3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, 4) complete the evaluation.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Media

Internet

References

  • American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth edition, Text Revision. Washington D.C., American Psychiatric Association, 2022.
  • Browne, K. C., Trim, R. S., Myers, U. S., & Norman, S. B. (2015). Trauma-related guilt: Conceptual development and relationship with posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 28(2), 134–141. doi:10.1002/jts.21999.
  • Guzman, D., Ann‐Yi, S., Bruera, E., Wu, J., Williams, J. L., Najera, J., … & Carmack, C. L. (2020). Enhancing palliative care patient access to psychological counseling through outreach telehealth services. Psycho‐Oncology, 29(1), 132-138. doi: 10.1002/pon.5270.
  • Kip, A., Diele, J., Holling, H., & Morina, N. (2022). The relationship of trauma-related guilt with PTSD symptoms in adult trauma survivors: a meta-analysis. Psychological medicine, 52(12), 2201-2211. https:// doi.org/10.1017/S0033291722001866
  • Norman, S. B., Haller, M., Kim, H. M., Allard, C. B., Porter, K. E., Stein, M. B., … Rauch, S. A. M. (2018). Trauma related guilt cognitions partially mediate the relationship between PTSD symptom severity and functioning among returning combat veterans. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 100, 56–62. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.02.003.
  • Poletti, B., Tagini, S., Brugnera, A., Parolin, L., Pievani, L., Ferrucci, R., … & Silani, V. (2021). Telepsychotherapy: a leaflet for psychotherapists in the age of COVID-19. A review of the evidence. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 34(3-4), 352-367.

Disclaimer

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