Symptom Media

Histrionic Personality Disorder

This training title highlights the major symptoms of Histrionic Personality Disorder.  Symptoms of Histrionic Personality Disorder may include: Acting or looking overly seductive, being easily influenced by other people, being overly concerned with one’s looks, being overly dramatic and emotional, being overly sensitive to criticism or disapproval, believing that relationships are more intimate than they actually are, blaming failure or disappointment on others, seeking constant reassurance or approval, having a low tolerance for frustration or delayed gratification, needing to be the center of attention (self centeredness), and quickly changing emotions which may seem shallow to others.

The patient in this episode demonstrates many of the classical symptoms of Histrionic Personality Disorder.

Acting / looking overly seductive:
Martha is wearing animated colors and jewelry in addition to dressing her dog in a tuxedo.

Being easily influenced by other people:
Martha reports that her boyfriend says that there is no longer any glamour in theater so she no longer auditions.  She reports that her manager says there is no money in theater so that is also why she no longer performs in theater.

Being overly concerned with one’s looks:
Martha is wearing animated colors and jewelry in addition to dressing her dog in a tuxedo. She reports that she would not kill herself because it would be a waste of “such a talented and beautiful person.”

Being overly dramatic and emotional:
It is important to focus on the intensity of emotion in this interview and not just the content. Martha cries and reports that her “date with George” didn’t go well. She says that she is “tired of being single.” She dramatically reports that she feels as if she is “Ophelia in Hamlet or the Virgin Mary.”  She reports that she gets sad because she is alone and 40 years old.  She reports that she has feelings of death and suicide, saying that she could drive her car off a cliff and that it would be “a spectacular way to go.”   She also dramatically reports she could commit suicide by robbing a bank.

Believing that relationships are more intimate than they actually are:
Mrs. Haywell prefers to be called Martha immediately upon the start of the interview, reporting that she feels as if she has known the therapist “all of her life,” despite the fact that they just met.  Martha reports that she doesn’t understand why her boyfriend George, after meeting him last week and having only two dates, has not called her again.

Blaming failure or disappointment on others:
Martha reports that the reason why she no longer auditions for theater is that one of her past boyfriends says there is “no longer any glamour in theater”  She also reports that the reason why she no longer performs theater is that her manager says she should transition to films since there is no money in theater.

Constantly seeking reassurance or approval:
Martha asks the therapist whether he likes her outfit as well as her dog, Marco’s clothes.  She follows up with the compliment received by the therapist asking, “are you sure” and offering to change should the therapist disapprove.  She remarks that she “just really loves compliments.”

Having a low tolerance for frustration or delayed gratification:
Martha reports that she auditioned for roles in the theater but has not been able to obtain roles.  She reports that occasionally there are roles that are “thrown my way.”  Martha reports that there is no glamour in theater so she no longer plans to audition.

Needing to be the center of attention (self centeredness):
Martha reports that when thinking about death or suicide, she thinks of the ways to kill herself which would garner the most attention.  Such thoughts include bank robbery during which helicopters and media will surround her and then reports perhaps she could dramatically overdose on drugs on stage.  She says that she wants to do everything like in the movies.  Martha reports about liking her glamorous days of being in theater, being at the center of the stage with all of the people noticing her.

Quickly changing emotions, which may seem shallow to others:
Martha’s emotions go from very animated, loving the therapist’s approval of her outfit to being on the verge of crying when asked why she came into the office today.  She goes from being upset about being presently being single, to all of a sudden reminiscing back to the 1940s when she could have been a top Jazz singer again, sad because “no one listens to Jazz now.”  Martha reports that her mood for the most part is up beat, “the beacon of light;” however, when the therapist asks “usually,” Martha responds that she sometimes gets in a down mood, displaying sadness and morose such as what happened when she had a date with George.

All segments are portrayals by actors. The training titles DO NOT include actual patients.

Please note you are viewing an abbreviated sample of the training title.  Actual Running Time of this training title is approximately 10 minutes.  Subscribe today to view films in their entirety.

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